Home Blog Page 3

Chainsaw Carving Tips

0

We Are Looking for More Carving Tips to Share With Carvers – Submit Them to: sculptures@chainsawsculptors.com All Tips Well be Credited to the Author

Bar Boring Depth

I used to take a black indelible ink pen I used in my greenhouse and marked my bar. After some cutting it would wear off. I now take and mark it and use my dermal tool to mark the bar permanently. I also know from the tip of my bar on my saw to the back of it’s measurements, plus to the back the saw from the tip of the bar, and any other easy spot to use is good to know and remember when cutting. I started doing this cutting firewood years ago and kept refining it.. Any method that is good for you will work.

Burls and knobs

I have been taking some of these burls and cutting them in half and using them for lamp bases, the knobs on large logs can be cut off and if good can be peeled and used too.. I then use a 2 inch tree or desired piece of of wood and make the tower for the lamp. I use a tree a few inches in Diameter with some black cherry burls starting to grow out of it. It makes the lamp tower look more interesting. I otherwise carve something on the lamp pole and/or base. Some of the bigger burls I have cut into slabs with my Alaskan Sawmill and use them for end tables.

Chain Sharpening

I use the Carroll D. Sanders method of sharpening. He has a tape for sale to explain his method. The only thing I do different then him and most carvers is the position I have the saw to sharpen it. I can’t lay a saw down and sharpen both sides equal with a file. I also can’t see the bottom of the top cutting plate very well this way. I ended up with teeth longer or different lengths on each side. To alleviate all these problems for me I went back to a way I was taught logging in Oregon in the 60’s. I stand the saw on the handle and have the bar between my legs. I then take the file and lay it in the tooth I’m going to sharpen. I then pull the chain up or down to get my angle and look at my marks I had ground in the bar for depth cutting, I use this mark for all the teeth. This makes my angle all the same, something I don’t have to watch so much with this method. I can also look and see if I have to much hook or to little and easy adjust by filing. Filing towards the bar and down gives me hook. Filing towards the cutter and no down pressure gives me less hook. You can look and see the hook so easy, so you have all the cutters the same. I then turn the saw 180 degrees and do the other side the teeth using the same mark on the bar for angle. After I have done the whole chain this way, I go over it with a flat file Carroll supplied to me. It is a Nicholson chainsaw flat file with cutting teeth on a half rounded edge on both sides. I use this on the underside of the top cutting plate edge to take the round bottom the round file makes.. Carroll’s tape will explain this properly. I’d rather sharpen with a file as you can adjust all the ways you can file you can’t do with a sharpener. The chain will stay sharper longer as the temper is not changed in the chain teeth by a file. Once every 3 or 4 sharpening a person should also use a raker gauge to adjust the height of the rakers.

Cracks in Carvings

Doc Parker told me this tip. Before you carve a piece of wood, cut an inch or two thick slice off it. Then lay that piece of wood in the shade. Let it dry tell you start to see enough cracks in it so you can read the wood as to where the cracks are going to happen. You can pick your piece up, then match it to the log you are carving and see the places the cracks will happen. This way you can locate your kerfs cut into the right location on the carving and put the back where it should belong for minimal damage to the carving from cracks. I’m sure that some variance in this rule will change with defects lower in the wood or grain changes and other character changes. I’m going to experiment with this in the summer and refine this more.

Crack Fixing

If you must repair cracks in carvings, form a small wedges. Use wood from the same piece of wood you are repairing if possible, if not try and use the same type and color of wedge as the wood being repaired. Make sure that this wedge is cut so the grain is the same direction as the grain in the crack you are going to repair. This is important for a blend in repair. If need be straighten the crack best you can to accept the wedge. After that tap the wedge into the crack and see where it is high. I usually do this and sand off the high spots with my dremel tool with a drum sander on it. I do this tell I feel I have a tight fit on my wedge. Apply the proper amount of glue and tap the wedge into the crack. I use a roofing knife and scour both sides the wedge and it will snap off easy. I then sand the wedge even with the carving. When finishing the piece natural I like to burn them with a torch. If I have wedges that show some, I take a black indelible marker and just hit them to blend them in and finish right over the top with my finishes that I am using.

Eyes

Try carving eyes inside out. I often hear new carvers say that they have the most trouble with faces and in particular, the eyes. When carving eyes, the common practice is to start at the outside and carve the eyelids and wrinkles first, then carve the eyeballs last. What often happens is that you run out of space for the eyeball. Try reversing the process. Carve the eyeball first, then the eyelid and wrinkles. Eyeballs tend to be a little on the large side at first, but you will have room for all the parts and its much easier. After you get the process down pat, proportion will fall into place.

Rick Woodward Eyes

After the paint is dry lay the carving down so the eyes are level. Its Devcon 5 minute epoxy. in the syringe. If your careful, use a toothpick pick up a small drop and you can put it right on the iris. If you wait a minute it will start to thicken, and not flow out so well. this will build a “cornea” or the lens bump. let it set up then pick up a bigger drop of fresh epoxy and let it flow over the whole eyeball. Don’t mess with it after it flows, you’ll leave a trail. I think The Indian i did is on Chainsawsculptors.com at Indian eyes site with a close up of the eye before epoxy and after in another picture. Arts & Craft Gallery

Cheryl Campbell Eyes

A few tips that might help you:

  1. do one eye at a time. The epoxy will flow slowly and you’ll have enough to keep track of.
  2. lay the carving down (talk soothingly so it doesn’t get nervous)
  3. you don’t need a lot, so maybe squeeze out a nickel sized dollop on a disposable plastic lid, foil, cardboard, something you can throw away.
  4. Terry McKinnon recommended using a screw head to stir it up and apply a drop. It’s like a mini-spoon and I still use that to apply a big drop to cover the whole eye.
  5. I also try to get a slight cornea bulge, but it’s in the way I move the carving or use a toothpick for control. Rick’s way might be better. I put it in because it’s easy and picks up the light.
  6. More is not better. It’s harder to control and leave a smooth surface. You want it to just coat the eyeball, not flow over the edge. Use a toothpick to gently scrape it back to the high point of the eye or remove it.
  7. Learn to quit playing with it. At some point it won’t settle and you’ll leave a lumpy, uneven surface that will definitely show when the light hits it.
  8. If you screw up, grind it off. Check out Cheryl’s fox eyes: Gallery
    Once you put the epoxy on, DON’T coat over the eyes with the finish you’re using for the rest of the carving!! You’ll completely lose the effect and the point of putting it on in the first place.

Terry McKinnin passed this along to put a thin first coat of epoxy on, put a little dot of white for a highlight (try at 2:00 position), then put another coat of epoxy on. It will give it a real 3D effect.

Finishing Tips

Finishes can vary due to the type of wood being used, the moisture content, the environment it is to be displayed in, and if finishing the carving all at once or over a period of time. Myself I use just about all black cherry dead standing or out of my firewood pile. The one main thing that I learned the hard way is to never leave it bare when putting away for even a day. Soon as I see the smallest cracks with my glasses on…. I put the oil or sanding sealer on or It will develop small cracks that will turn big over night. The more heat the faster this is going to happen. I always coat mine with sanding sealer or 3 in 1 oil in-between work stages. I only use the oil if that’s what I’m going to use for a base preservative under my main sealer. I use the 3 in 1 oil when I want a deeper tone to my wood. It makes the black cherry a deep aged look. When I’m done with a carving I either give it all the oil it will take for about 3 days brushed on. If not using oil I use sanding sealer and give my carvings 1 coat a day for 2 or 3 days. I use an oil base spar/urethane in clear, satin, and gloss. It all depends on the carving and what the customer wants for a finish. Putting a finish on the bottom for me is like this: If you believe the moisture should seep in and out at will and stabilize or you think the carving should not have any moisture to enter or leave. I let my inside carvings not sealed on the bottom and my outside ones I seal. I carve mostly only dry dead standing or cut dried black cherry logs so most of my wood is a hardwood and already fairly well seasoned but will still crack real quick without a sanding sealer on it. I do not cut kerfs in dry cherry but do in green wood. I use all outdoor type spar/urethane because I never know if I am going to put some carvings outside and bring others inside. I like to rotate them different times of the year, also I imagine some customers might too. This is one method. You will find as many ways to finish as you can find carvers. This is just my way. I finish my mushrooms different. Listed below.

Human Face

A human head looking at it from the side should fit into a square from under the chin to the top of the head, from the back the head to the tip of the nose. The head is 3/4 as wide as it is long and high. The eyes and head should be sized so that 5 eye lengths will go across the head where the 2 eyes go, the eyes should be one eye width apart. The front of the face is divided into 4 parts, 3 equal ones and the hair part. The 3 equal ones are from under the chin to under the nose, under the nose to the eye brow line, and the eye brow line to the hair line. The hair line is 10% of the top of the head. The middle of the eyes are half way between the top of the head and chin. The corners of the mouth should be even with the center of the eyes. The bottom of the nose should be 1 eye wide. The top of the ears should be located near with the eye brow line, the bottom of the ears aligned with an area between the upper lip and bottom of the nose line. The distance of a face is equal from ear to ear on the bottom across the face, to chin to eyebrows. Also this measurement is equal from the tip of the nose to the front of the ears.

Mushrooms

I like to carve my mushrooms upside down. that is carve the stem first. It is so much easier to see the stem to carve it and also to carve the bottom of the cap. I then turn it over and do the cap. I do different caps. Some I like to do into a toad stool to sit around the campfire or for footrests. Some I make two or 3 smaller ones on it. I then like to do opposite of other carvings. I bring them in to sit around the wood stove to crack. When they are dried out and cracked I then take a grinder and round off the cracked edges. I like to finish most of my mushrooms with Behr deck sealer. It’s good for a long time and gives the mushrooms a golden/brown to make them look better then with a spar. I otherwise leave them unfinished after rounding the crack corners or paint them as desired.
Tip by Ed Meyers – For planting the mushrooms at random in the yard, drill a hole in the bottom and install rebar rod in bottom to put in the ground. This eliminates the base needed for standing them. Doc Parker tried it and says it makes them easy to paint too.

Paint Brushes

An old guy that hated to paint and hated to clean his brushes more showed me this one. He said just wrap them in a plastic bag or wrapper of some kind and put them in the freezer. I found this to work great. After a number of freezes and thaws I clean them and start the freezing again tell they are no good and toss them. One kind of spar/urethane made them gum up. Don’t remember the name of it. All other paints and spars it worked great on.
Another way that works good for us frequent users of paint brushes is to set them in a pail of water submerged. Just take them out and wipe them off and use them. Just make sure to keep them submerged and not let the water evaporate.

A Large Selection of None Clogging Long Lasting Carbide Coated Tools

0

We are the only dealer who carry every tool Saburr-Tooth makes in stock Shop in Saburr-Tooth Tools largest online Store Front. If we don’t have it the Factory doesn’t either.

If you can find our tools cheaper anyplace else, let us know and we’ll match their price for immediate shipment. We stock all that we sell, not drop ship.

Special Tool Sales

Donut Wheels and Sanding Disc’s – Sleeves
Power Carving Cup Rasps
1/4 Inch Shank tools – For use with Flex Shaft or Die Grinder
3/32nd Shank Burrs
1/8th Shank Burrs – For use with Dremel Tools

We accept all major credit cards and PayPal

3 ways to shop

Order by Phone 906-265-9599
6AM to 8PM 7 days a week
by USPS Ground mail click here
Or our following Storefronts
Chainsawsculptors.com Store #1
Books – DVD’s
Saburr-Tooth Tools

We are the lowest price on the Internet for these tools

  • POWER CARVING
  • WOOD WORKING
  • FURNITURE
  • ICE-CARVING
  • SCULPTING
  • DENTAL LABS
  • ORTHOTIC LABS
  • TAXIDERMY
  • PATTERN SHOPS
  • D.I.Y.
  • HOBBYIST
  • LOG HOME BUILDING
  • CONSTRUCTION
  • CNC–MACHINING
  • MILLING
  • WOOD
  • RUBBER
  • SILICONE
  • PLASTIC
  • FOAM
  • BONE
  • ICE
  • FIBERGLASS
  • POLYURETHANE
  • EPOXIES
  • ACRYLICS
  • COMPOSITES
  • GRAPHITE
  • SOAP STONE
  • ALABASTER

Memorial of Past Carvers

0

his is a memorial page for members who have passed on to the other side and were members of Chainsawsculptors.com. If anyone has any good memories of anyone listed here and would like to share with the rest of us please e-mail them to me at: sculptures@chainsawsculptors.com

William “Bill” Plant
Bub Sutton

Members

0
Adamik, Terry
Adams, Brandon
Adams, Don
Adamson, John
A. D. & Simon Tree Service
Adler, Kelli
Adrichem, Peter Van
Ahlefeldt, Uirik
Akki, Arvind T
Alberti, Alec Jr
Albright, Dwight
Anderson, John
Angell, Jim
Archer, Simon
Armstrong, Boone
Armstrong, Joe
Armstrong, Patrick
Arsenault, John
Askeland, Arne
Aslin, Bill
Atanasoff, Sergio
Austin, Richard
Avila, Fred
Babayev, Chingiz
Babb, Jeremy

Babcock, Ed
Bachman, Tim
Backus, Steve
Baggett, Michael
Ballard, Gary
Barber, Joseph
Bardell, Chris
Barg, Gary
Barker, Karl
Barker, Kevin
Barker, Karen
Barker, Timothy
Barnes, James
Barnett, Allison
Barry, Barry
Bauknecht, Fred
Bauknecht, John
Bratzel, Sigard
Beck, Mike
Beckinsale, Rob
Beeler, Shawn E
Beeson, Jesse
Bench, Terry Delaine
Bender, Heath
Bergey, Jim
Berger, Murray
Berson, Eric
Besco, Dan
Bevilacqua, Ron
Bigwood and The Carving Co.
Bihlimaier, Michae
Bilodeau, Steve
Birtwistle, Johnathan
Bishop, Rob
Black, Kevin N
Blair, Dan
Blair, RL
Blakeslee, T K
Blewett, Josh
Boatright, Art
Bojalad, Jim
Bolf, Joe
Boni, Liz
Boni, Rick
Botha, Missy
Bowers, Kenny
Boy, Bobi
Boyds Bear country
Braaten, Faye
Brady, John
Brakemeier, Roberto
Brandow, Cassie
Brant, Steve
Brasher, Terry
Braun, Kenneth
Braunscheidel, Tom
Brazie, Troy David
Breden, Stephen A
Breese, George
Breitenfeldt, Trace
Briges, Jack
Brittle, Lance
Britton, Brett
Brown, Cory
Brown, Scott
Brown, Sue
Bruning, Lorie
Bugner, Hank
Burgess, Tim
Burns, Daniel
Burkett, Chuck
Bussard, Richard
Cain, David
Calder, Jim JR
Caldwell, Michael T
Campbell, Cheryl
Campbell, Jessica
Campbell, Randall
Campbell, Troy
Capstraw, Ronald
Carey,  Gary F
Carico, Brad
Carillo, Criag R
Carr, George K
Cattanach, Wayne
Cavoli, Frank
Cencel, Vlado
Chalfin, Greg
Chalmers, Iain
Chaney, Richard
Chapin, Larry M
Charlton, Alicia
Chasnoff, Brian
Chesley, Bob
Cheta, Jerome
Chris, Chris
Christ, Christopher
Christman, Brian
Churton, Errol
Clark, Michael
Clark, Rodger
Clark, Wade
Cochrane, Bob
Collin, Stephen
Coleman, Jeff
Compagne, Jeroen
Conkie, Leigh

Conley, Mike
Connors, Kris
Conway, John
Cook, Sylvia
Coonard, R D
Copas, Michael E
Coppersmith, Shaun M
Corbelli, Carl
Corpe, Dale
Cotey, Ken
Cox, Rick
Cozens, Nick
Crabb, Matthew
Craggs, Thomas
Crawford, Glenn
Cro, Rob
Crow, Ed
Crow, Robert Martin JR
Cross, Eva
Crowley, Bill
Crull, Laverne
Culp, Mickey D
Cummings, James “Andy”
Dagg, Joshua
Dahl, Jarrett
Dahlke, Justin
Dahr, Jeff
Dahr, Jeff Sr
Dainel, Dainel
Danczyk, Chad
Davidsson, Bert
Davis, James Alan
Davis, Mickey
Davis, Steven
Deforge, Dan
DeMoustes, Alex
Denkins, James
Deruchie, Robin
Derksen, George
Despres, Antoine
Destefano, Chris
Dickey, Dave
Digh, Julie
Dillavou, Ron
Doeren, Jamie
Doeren, Lisa
Doyle, Pat
Dozier, Charlie
Dunning, Sam
Doane, Erv
Dougherty, Harley
Dougherty, Sam
Drafall, Joe
Draper, Bob
Dunfield, Tommy
Dupe, Matt
Duttry, Rick
Dvorak, Mark
Dziewit, John
Eagle Creek Carving Co.
Easterle, Mark
Earp, Mark
Edith, Plazotta
Edwards, Bob
Edwards, Richelle
Edwards, Joseph
Ehart, Jodi
Ehart, Russell
Ehm, Albert
Eichman, Kendall L
Elario, Todd
Elias, Ahmad
Elias, Ruben
Elkins, Deedee

El Mansour, Mansy
Elrod, Butch
Emini, Shefqet
Emmons, Jason
Engleman, Larry
Easterle, Mark
Erdely, Steven Barry Jr
Etue, April
Etue, Don
Everett, Randy
Ewald, Tim
Fallis, Dan
Fallis, Tynna
Favaro, Flavio
Fee, Williams
Feener, Brian
Feil, Amy
Ferguson, David
Fields, Zach
Fink, Thomas Lee
Findlay, Foster
Finn, Brain
Flaherty, Brain
Florea, David
Force, Ricky
Force, Suzanne
Foreman, Bob
Foreman, Robert L
Fox, Larry
Foy, Elaine
France, Jerry
Frank, Barry
Frazier, Charlie
Freeman, Bess
French, Phil
Frenette, Paul
Friedrichs, Detlef
Furgason, David
Furniss, Robin
Gainey, Chad
Gallaher, Tom
Galley, Jason
Gannon, Dean
Garcia, Carol
Garcia, Tony
Garland, David
Gehrke, Deb
Geib, Ken
Genovese, Donna
Georges, Chuck
Gernhardt, Kim
Ghiotto, James
Gianneetti, John
Gibson, Chuck
Gil, Bruce
Gill, Timothy
Gillespie,  Matt
Gilliland, Shellien
Gillman, Tom
Glines, Lonney
Godbert, Sean
Godwin, Rich
Goebel, Garry
Goszulak, Andy
Gottfreed, Jeff
Gottfried, Jeff
Gray, Roy Jack
Greydanus, Lynne
Groeschen, Jessie
Guyer, Wayne
H. Steve
Hailes, Stephen
Hall, Matthew
Hall, Tim
Halliwell, Clint
Halverson, Matthew
Halverson, Sharon L
Hamack, Ed
Hambrook, Matt
Hamilton, Kelly
Hamilton, Mike
Hancock, Bo
Hannemann, Rodger
Hanvey, Michael
Harding, Dan
Harnett, Brian
Harrison, Steve
Hart, Mike
Harwell, T.W.
Hatfield, Dale
Hatley, Matt
Haugh, Chuck
Havranek, Shawn
Haynes, Steven
Hebsta
Hellams, Douglas
Hemming, Nansi
Henderson, Alvin
Hennen, Theresa
Henry, Ana N
Herschberger, Karrie
Hestand, Vern
Higginbotham, Carl
Hightower, Ronald
Hildebrant, D.K
Hilger, Art
Hill, Sharon
Hillman, Sharon
Hillesland, David
Hochstetler, Donny
Hoehn, Douglas V
Hoff, Paul
Hoffman, Kurt
Hogan, William
Hokanson, Mitch
Holbert, Patrick
Holmes, Dave
Horine, Michael N
Horne, John
Howell, Ed and Brenda
Huber, Stephanie
Hughes, Mike
Hunsinger, Patty
Hunt, W. C.
Ingvoldstad, Curtis
Isenbarger, Greg
Iverson, Leif
Iyall, Thomas
Jackson, Kay
Jackson, Troy
James, Doug
James, Leland
Janzen, Max
Jarvis, Thomas
Jenkins, Robert
Jenner, Mark
Jeranson, Ric
Joanis, Joseph P
John, John
John, Ken
Johnk, Ethan
Johnson, Bill
Johnson, Carly
Johnson, David
Johnson, Don
Johnson, Rich
Judd, Jacob
Kallos, Sally
Kane, Ron
Kandow, Norm
Karen
Karl, Roland
Kaser, Phil
Kauffman, Michael
Keating, Timothy N
Keenan, Gary
Keinath, John
Keller, Mark
Keller, Thomas
Kellogg, Lance R
Kelly, Michael L
Kemp, Robert
Kenny, John

Kenzora, Steven
Kern, John
Kerzner, Lathan Ann
Keseluk, Brad
Kidder, Robert
Kieffer, Donald
Kiesel, Paul
Kinch, Brian
King, Bob
King, Joe
Kisor, Tim
Kitchens, Jimmy
Kittelsen, Dave
Klatt, Jeff
Klein, Bonnie
Kline, Terry
Knoblock, Erick
Koch, Stephan
Kocis, Michael
Kohlbrenner, Bob
Konyaev, Alexander
Koon, Walter
Koschker, April R
Kottmann, Dave
Kricheldorf, Gord
Krol, Edward P
Kroschel, Shaun
Kubara, Russ
Kuebler, Rick
Kuefler, Richard
Kuefler, Scott
Kuharovic, Drazen
Kurt, Kurt
Kyriakos, Kyri
LaBlanc, Cara
Lackey, John
LaCourse, Roy
Lancaster, Jeff
Lane, David
Larson, Donald
Lasch, Janine
Laskowski, Jeff
Lauderdale, Kerry
Laundra, Debbie
Lavell, John
Lavoie, David
Leaseburg, Bill
Lee, Brian
Lee, Tonya
Lengyel, Sandor
Lepley, Scott
Lessar, Mike
Lewis, Charles G.
Lewis, Dayle K
Lewkowicz, Lynn
Lilley, Warwick
Lindgren, Torbjörn
Line, Gabe
Linjer, Kirby
Link, James T
Linton, Sawdust
Livingston, Iain
Long, Chuck
Long, Jim
Love, Bongo
Love, Jack
Lowden, Jessie
Lowden, Keith
Lowden, Milton
Lowden, Miranda
Lucas, Jacob
Luebben, Jordan
Luebben, Rolland
Luer, Al
Luer,  Corrinne
Lukinich, James
Lyon, Wayne
Macleod, Alex
Madsen, Jacob Jay
Madsen, James A
Madsen, Kelly
Mahoney, Daniel
Mahoney, Mark
Malter, Roger
Manning, Greg
Mansy, Dr
Manweller, Rick
Marble, Roger
Markham, Kim
Marshall, Dan
Martin, Faith
Martin, Gary
Martineau, Michael
Masson, Sam
Matijevich, Ryan
Maurus, Georg
Mayo, Steve
McBride, Matthew
McBride, Shawn
McCaughn, Casey
McCormick, Michael
McDermott, Mike
McElroy, Brandy
McEntire, Jack
McEwen, Mal
McFaul, Rob
McGeever, John
McGrath, Tony
McLain, Brett
McLaughlin, Francis
Mclean, Myles
McNut, Paul V
McVay, Pat
Meyers, George
Meza, Josefina
Michalski, Ann
Miller, Kolby
Miller, Lucas
Miller, Lynn
Miller, Ryan
Mohr, Jeffrey
Monaghan, Grace Young
Montanavisions.com
Montoya, Alonzo
Moon, Paul
Morgan, Diana
Morrision, Langdon
Mortimer, Bob
Morton, Jason
Motondi, Gerard  Oroo
Mulder, Sam
Mull, C
Murphy, Allen
Murray, Kevin
Murray, Mike
Murray, Steve
Myers, David Jr.
Myers, Nick
Mykkanen, Jon
Nasby, Rick
Nascimento, Paulo
Neighbors, Charles
Neighbors, Desiree
Nelson, Chap
Newschwander, Matt
Nicholson, Von
Niemeyer, Scott R
Niittykoski, Marika
Nilson, Steve
Northup, George
Nuffer, Shawn
Offutt, James
Oke, Greg
Onac, Nick
Onweller, Michael
Olsen, Ross
Orange, Gary
O’Rourke, Simon
O’Sullivan, Susan
Outland, Pamela
Owen, Scott
P. Sarah
Packie, Kenneth
Page, Mike
Pakkalen, Ryan
Parker, Doc
Parker, Jon C
Parr, Brian
Parr, Nathan
Parrish, Justin
Parson, Denius
Parson, Dennis
Parsons, Dave
Partridge, Colin
Patric, Patric
Pattillo, Tim
Payne, Beverly
Pearson, Steve
Pechan, Maritza
Penna, Domingo
Penrod, Trent
Perry, Wanda
Petersen, Niels Ejnar
Peterson, Dan
Peterson, Gary
Peterson, Kevin
Peterson, Jim
Petrillo, Jim
Pethtel, Richard
Pethtel, Traci
Phillips, Greg
Phillips, Roark
Piazza, Dean
Pilcher, Roy
Pilsl, Al
Pinney, Jeffrey M
Pinske, Barre
Pirk, Taavi
Pittman, Michael
Pitts, Randy
Piwonski, Casey
Polglaze, Angie
Popoff, Lueb
Porcal, Radim
Porter, Steven
Prothero, Scott
Puronvarsi, Tero
Purkey, Rodger
Powell, Jon
Quick, Hoppy
Rabius, David
Rae, Gordon
Rager, Steve
Ranquist, Ed
Raymond, Jim
Reichert, Laura
Rek, Bobby
Renaud, Jerilyn Beals
Reynolds, Dave
Reynolds, Laurie
Rhodes, Rick
Rice, Mark W
Rick
Rick, Dean
Ricks, Doug
Rigby, Lance
Robbins, Adrian
Roberg, Brian
Robinson, John
Robinson, Lyn
Rogerson, Shane L
Roghair, Dennis
Rohr, Tim
Roloson, Glenn
Rosamond, P.

Rose, Micheal
Ross, Daniel
Ross, Jon Thomas
Rourke, Jim
Rouse, Rob
Rusinov, Vladimir
Rusk, Caleb
Russeau, Raphael
Ruth, Brian
Ruth, Watson Jen
Rutkowski, Janet
Rutt, Paula
Sandry, Adrian
Sansone, Walter
Sassaman, Daniel Lee
Sayas, Florencio
Scarpino, Annunziata C
Schaefer, Mike
Schaefer, Suzanne
Schafer, Diane
Schieffer, Jerry
Schlegel, William
Schmidt, Claudia
Schmidt, Michael W
Schulz, John R
Schumacher, Bernd
Schwindt, Theresa
Scoggins, Dayton
Scoggins, Michelle
Semler, Joe Jr
Senz, Sam
Servis, Cindy
Sheen, Ken
Sherman, Pat
Shiver, Barb
Sibley, Kane
Sidney, Danny
Simpson, Barry
Skal, Damian
Skaneby, Alf
Smet, Lee
Smith, Donald
Smith, Ernest L.
Smith, Gregor
Smith, Matt
Smith, Nathan
Smith, Robert
Smock, Monte
Snowberger, Bob
Snyder, John W
Snyder, Patrick
Sobaszkewicz, Joseph
Sonntag, Billy
Sorvala, Mark
Sparks, Ben
Sparks, Tony
Spetzler, Gary
Spina, Scott
Staiduhar, Shari
Staley, Mike
Stark, Cliff
Starkey, Rick
Steinacher, Craig
Stenger, Steve
Stevens, Michael
Stevenson, Tim
Stewart, Lisa
Stinger, Doug
Stout, Jennifer
Strack, Jesse
Strom, Mark
Stuart, Stuart
Sukumar, Arun
Sultan, Jimmy
Surfus, Samantha
Surfus, Scott
Sutton, Bub
Swanson, Jeff
Sweney, Dan
Swinney, Joe
Switzer, Bobbie
Tadina, Larry
Talbot, Clair
Tamoszus, Michael
Tanel, Pirk
Tanner, Dan
Taylor, Bob
Taylor, Brain
Taylor, Ken
Taylor, James
Temanson, Lisa
Teodor, Moldovan
The Sculptor of Tahoe
Thiessen, Linda
Thoreson, Peter
Thomas, Roger
Tichy, Jan
Tidwell, Robert
Tilley, Dick
Tillotson, Bruce
Tillotson, Jakob
Tillotson, Midge
Tipler, Kathy
Tormikoski, Marika
Tracy, Jim
Treat, Kevin
Trott, Libbie
Troy, Troy
Trumbley, Greg
Tuhantio, Janito
Turner, Jason
Turner, John
Tveten, Adam
Tynan, Ken
Tyoe, Mark
Umar
VandenBos, Nate
Vanelderen, Hans
Vazquez, Jose
Ventis, Leandro
Venus, James C
Vermillion, Josh
Verrazzano, Glynis
Vild, Don
Vincent, Jon

Volk, Charlie
Volunteer, Miranda
Voreland, Bud
Vrba, Thomas
Waits, Robert
Walls, John
Wambolt, Dean
Ward, Shawn
Warner, J D
Warren, Vaughn
Watson, Mark
Waugerman, Claude
Weaver, Hank
Webb, Gem
Weber, adrienne
Webster, Dwight
Weiss, Mike
Weiss, Tom
Welms, Daniel
Wentz, Tom
Wenzoski, Robbin
Weston, Ben
Whitaker, Horace
White, Christina
Whited, Todd
Widitz, Eric
Widitz, Luise
Wilkins, Joe
Williams, Bradly
Williams, Dee
Williams, Herschel D
Williams, John
Williamson, William R
Willis, Brian
Winkler, Mike
Winkler, Rene
Winner, Don
Winston-Hart, David
Winter, Sara
Wojtkowski, Mieczyslaw
Wolf, Lone
Wolff, Bill
Wolff, Terry
Wood, Big
Wood, Eric
Woodward, Rick
Worthen, Stan
Wright, Art
Wright, Betty
Wright, Craig
Wroble, Tony
Wulf, Braden
Yackley, Chet
Yates, Brad
Young, Greg
Younger, Bob
Yuen, Carrie
Zambelas, Andrew
Zeadker, Dan
Zielke, Clay
Zimmerman, Gary
Zingone, Amy
Zollinger, Freddie
Zoltán, Székely

 

Chainsaw Sculptor Information Center

0

Chainsaw Carving – Books – DVDs – VHS Tapes

Arbortech Carving Wheels
JONSERED CHAINSAWS
Baileys-online – chainsaw_carving
Klingspor
Cape Forge
LOG MOVING EQUIPMENT
Carlton Chain
Oregon Chain
CHAIN SAW COLLECTORS CORNER
SHINDAIWA CHAINSAWS
CHAINSAWSCULPTORS MEMBERS TOOL SALES
STIHL INCORPORATED Chain – Sharpening – Sprocket – MaintenanceThe Compleat Sculptor, Inc.
Custom Made Chainsaw Bars
Tilton Chainsaws
ECHO CHAINSAWS
Van Dykes Taxidermy Supplies
GB CARVING BARS
WoodCarvingPatterns.com
Home Depot
WOOD-MIZER
HUSQVARNA CHAINSAWS

TREES – WOOD – NATURE – RELATED ARTICLES

Owls
WOOD PEST CONTROL
Patuxent Bird Identification Info Center
WOUND DRESSINGS: RESULTS OF STUDIES OVER 13 YEARS

WOOD FINISH – PRESERVATIVES – WOOD FILLER – GLUES

PENTACRYL
BEHR
SIKKENS
Environmental Technology Inc
TUFF CARVE PUTTY BY FREEMAN
GORILLA GLUE
VARATHANE
MINWAX

COMPUTERS

AD-AWARE
COMPUTER TIPS
AVG FREE ANTIVIRUS PROTECTION
SPYBOT

INFORMATION WEB SITES

AMERICA’S MOST WANTED
Search Systems
CONSUMER HEALTH INFORMATION
STATE GOVERNMENT INFORMATION
Guinness World Records
THE OLD FARMER’S ALMANAC
HOW STUFF WORKS
Unclaimed Money Search
Information Please Almanac
USEFUL ROPE KNOTS
Language Translator
U. S. FED GOVERNMENT INFORMATION
Library of Congress
US POSTAL SERVICE
LOG WEIGHT- VOLUME CALCULATORS
WACKY USES OF PRODUCTS
MAPQUEST
WHITE HOUSE
National-Local weather-intellicast
Pharmageddon Herbal Western Herbology Revealed

SCIENCE

NATIONAL GEOPHYSICAL DATA CENTER
DIVE AND DISCOVER
NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ASSOC.
EARTH AND MOON VIEWER
NOVA ONLINE – Science Programming
SETI – Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
US NAVAL OBSERVATORY

STOLEN ART WORK

0

Report any art that has been stolen, recovered, or seen someplace to:
sculptures@chainsawsculptures.com
Home Phone: 1-906-265-9599
Mail Address: 243 North Hill Road
Iron River, Michigan 49935
or Your Local Police

FAQ

0

Frequently Asked Chainsaw Carving Questions

Post your question here for an expert to answer, Your question will be posted here with the answer for a new FAQ Data Base we are starting. If you wish to answer a question or add to one, Cut and Paste the question here and your answer below it and we’ll list it among the other answers. We would like to hear from everyone that has a different method. Ask a personal question to any of us to answer as experienced carvers and see how we do it. We all are some different in our ways of carving as in life. These we are listing are only a few ways of doing chainsaw carving

Experienced chainsaw carvers to Answer your questions

  1. Barre Pinske
  2. Bob King
  3. Cheryl Campbell
  4. Dick Tilley
  5. Doug Ricks
  6. Jim Rourke
  7. Joe Rego
  8. Milton Lowden

Ask a question personal to us or in general we’ll answer it our way of doing it. Others may answer their way too and I will post their answer. Open a New Topic for Questions or ask any question.

Electric Chainsaws

Question: I want to start out using a Makita high speed electric saw, what will be the limitations for me.

Milton: You will be limited to smaller hardwood or medium softwood carvings in size. It is possible to carve bigger carvings with an electric saw but not feasible as it would take so long. If it’s all you can use then that’s the way to go. If you can use gas go that way and use the electric for detail. They are under powered and to low of a chain speed for blocking out larger carvings.

Gas Chainsaws

Step by step cleaning oil pump by Doug Ricks – Step by step cleaning oil pump
Step by step to finding and cleaning (replacing) that little check valve filter for the fuel tanks on ECHO – Bar Oil fuel valve cleaning

Question: I have a Husquvarna 357 and have recently started playing about making mushrooms, but my saw keep cutting out then stopped all together I changed the spark plug and I started again but only for about a half hour, has anyone got any ideas?
Open for answering.

Question: I am just getting started what kind of saw and other equipment should I buy? I’m ready to get the stuff I need to get started.

Bob: OK, well honestly you only “need” one small quality saw to get going. I’m very pro-ECHO products but you need to buy what you can get help with later if the need arises. Anyway a lightweight finish saw, 4-4.5″ angle grinder set up for sanding discs, a dremel moto tool, a small propane torch and some good safety equipment for eyes, ears, legs and lungs. Its been my experience to buy the quality tools first rather than wishing you did later… After awhile you’ll find more and more equipment to purchase (the quest is immense). Keep in touch with other like minded carvers. They will help you to keep from re-inventing the wheel… See you, Bob

Jim: To start out you’ll need a mid range powered chainsaw to rough out carvings, one with a narrow bar is preferable and 16″ long is ideal. Once you get the feel of rough carving, get yourself a small chainsaw with a dime tip carving bar and 1/4 pitch chain for detailing. They are available as a carving package from Bailey’s Logging Supply or various carvers who sell tools. Grinders, sanders, die grinders, dremel, etc. can be added to your arsenal if you like but they aren’t absolutely necessary. Safety gear is absolutely required. Chaps, safety glasses, work boots and ear protection at minimum. If you aren’t experienced with chainsaws get safety instructions from a pro in person. Starting with a carving bar doing smaller carvings can be the safest method to learn if you have little experience with saws as they are much less likely to kick back due to the small radius of the bar tip.

Hydraulic Chainsaws

Question: What exactly is a Hydraulic Chainsaw? I picture myself pulling around a long, high pressure hose and an oily mess on the floor. What’s it really like? The hydraulic saw is simple. A an electric motor turns an hydraulic pump. The pump pumps oil from a tank to the saw and back into the tank. On the saw there is a valve that diverts the oil to the saws motor (basically two meshing gears) which turns the chain. The oil is recirculated from the tank to the saw and back again and only when you give it gas so to speak does it turn the chain. Nothing sprays. The hydraulic oil does lubricate the chain which is nice you don’t need to add bar oil every 20 minutes. it puts out oil on the bar in an amount you can regulate. The saws are light and powerful because the pump is the power source. Did you need more information on it. I can send you to the owners of the companies that make them and they are very friendly to answering questions on their product.

Chain Sharpening and Bars

Question: What kind of oil is best to use for your chainsaw?

Milton: I think chainsaw bar oil sold at chainsaw shops and other places specifically made for this purpose are best for your chainsaw. Some other oils may be better for the carving finish you are working on but a lot harder on the saw. Doug Ricks explains here in photo’s and an explanation of what some other oils may be doing to your saw: Step by Step Echo filter changes and bar oil use results

Question: I want to buy a chain grinder. I know there are grinders for 500.00+ and low as 30.00. My question is–is there a mid range cost grinder that is good and reliable?

Milton: You can get a good one from here at Northern Tool: http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/NTESearch?storeId=6970&N=0&Ntk=All&Ntt=chainsaw%20sharpener&Nty=1&D=chainsaw%20sharpener&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial&Dx=mode+matchallpartial

I prefer to just bring them to the saw shop when I really hit something bad, else I hand sharpen as them grinders seem to take the temper out of the tooth some and the sharpening don’t last as long. I also hand sharpen because I can put more or less hook in the chain to make it grab more or less and you can’t do this with a machine very easy or as good. They are a handy rig though when you hit nails or other things and need an evening out.

Question: I found that my chainsaw was cutting strangely today. I was cutting up the larger diameter logs and was having to do an awful lot of work even with the under 12” logs. If I tried cutting with the bottom of the bar, near the engine (i.e. like you’re supposed to) the chain would cut great for about two inches, then stop cutting almost completely. It also wanted to curve to the left as I went into the wood. However if I did a sort of plunge / push cut using the bottom 1/2 of the tip, the chain cut well, throwing lots of chips. It would also work well doing up cuts with the bar’s top edge, though again it worked better close to the tip. I tried sharpening the chain (with the HF chain grinder) which helped some, but not a huge amount. I took the rakers down a couple of sharpening ago. The bar has a lot of bluing around the groove, but I am getting plenty of oil. I did notice that I could “rock” the chain to the left and right a fair distance. I’ve been flipping the bar on a pretty regular basis. Any ideas? Have I fried the bar?

Milton: What happen is your chain started to become uneven and one side was sharper, or the teeth filed longer on one side, or one side could have hit something to dull it more then the other side. This made it pull to one side and spread your bar. My advise would to be is once your saw does not cut into a log or carving by itself without much pressure applied you should stop cutting and clean out your saw, switch the bar, sharpen the chain, clean the filter, and gas and oil up. With your situation now I would bring it all to a chainsaw shop and if the bar is any good yet they can squeeze it back together to the right tolerance and grind it back in shape, or even put a new tip on if needed. Also I would bring in your chain and have them machine sharpen it so it is all even again and you should be good to go.

Question: Sharpening a chainsaw.

For a newbie starting off carving what would an expert recommend they do, free hand or use a file guide?

1.Basic sharpening for a standard bar and chain.

Milton: Here is a great guide to sharpening saw chains for beginners. This should answer both your questions above. “Keeping Your Chainsaw Sharp” http://www.motherearthnews.com/DIY/2002-10-01/Keeping-Your-Chainsaw-Sharp.aspx

2.Advanced techniques for carving bars.

Open for answering.

3.Square-Ground filing

Dick Tilley: Square-Ground Filing Here is an excellent link explaining how to….
http://www.oregonchain.com/tech/ms_manual/ms_06.pdf
and another….
http://www.forestapps.com/tips/squarechain/squareground.pdf
and some basic stuff…
http://www.stihllibrary.com/pdf/SharpAdvice110606.pdf

4.Tools, “Double bevel”, “Hexagon”, “Goofy Files
Milton: Saburr-Tooth die grinder and dremel bits are the best I have found. That is why we sell them here:

5.Any dangers or increased risks from modified sharpening techniques.
“Example, cutters that can possibly cut through leggings.”

Milton: Anytime you change anything from a factory specification you are voiding any law suits and are at a possible risk for danger. I don’t personally think a modified chain would cut through good chaps but a person never knows. I do not see any dangers myself and I do modify my chains for carving to suit my needs.

Question: How many times typically can you sharpen a chain before you toss it out?

Milton: In my opinion I would say it would depend on many factors. Some of them are your sharpening experience, what kind of wood you are cutting, if the wood was dirty or clean, what kind of chain you are talking about as some have better metal in them then others, and if you hit anything with it. I sharpen my chain by hand for 52 years now and I think it took me a few years or more to get comfortable with free hand. If I hit rocks or metal in the carving and really mess the chain up I will only then put it on a grinder to straighten out the teeth and not spread the bar by uneven cutting. I file my teeth down and use the chain tell at least one quarter of the teeth are gone most of the time. I think they cut faster when they are wore out and like thin needles. They fly off and I always wondered where they go……………

Question: What is the most widely utilized method of sharpening your chainsaw chain? (file by hand , electric sharpener or dremel) ? and why?

Milton: I think that would be up to the persons sharpening experience. Filing by hand is a preferred method of mine as sharpening by grinding wheels and such cause heat and temper loss to the tooth edge and they won’t stay as sharp as long as using a hand file.

The only thing I do different then most carvers is the position I have the saw to sharpen it. I can’t lay a saw down and sharpen both sides equal with a file. I also can’t see the bottom of the top cutting plate very well this way. I ended up with teeth longer or different lengths on each side. To alleviate all these problems for me I went back to a way I was taught logging in Oregon in the 60’s. I stand the saw on the handle and have the bar between my legs. I then take the file and lay it in the tooth I’m going to sharpen. I then pull the chain up or down to get my angle and look at my marks I had ground in the bar for depth cutting, I use this mark for all the teeth. This makes my angle all the same, something I don’t have to watch so much with this method. I can also look and see if I have to much hook or to little and easy adjust by filing. Filing towards the bar and down gives me hook. Filing towards the cutter and no down pressure gives me less hook. You can look and see the hook so easy, so you have all the cutters the same. I then turn the saw 180 degrees and do the other side the teeth using the same mark on the bar for angle. After I have done the whole chain this way, I go over it with a flat file. It is a Save Edge chainsaw flat file with cutting teeth on a half rounded edge on both sides. I use this on the underside of the top cutting plate edge to take the round bottom the round file makes. I’d rather sharpen with a file as you can adjust all the ways you can file you can’t do with a sharpener. The chain will stay sharper longer as the temper is not changed in the chain teeth by a file. Once every 3 or 4 sharpening a person should also use a raker gauge to adjust the height of the raker.

Finishes

Question? Someone told me to start using trans fluid or antifreeze, pre paint or stains i also like fire and light stains would either of those discolor the wood?

Milton: I wouldn’t use antifreeze or trans fluid as if someone handled or a young kid chewed on it or similar it would be poisonous to them. Any stain is going to discolor the wood. that’s what staining is about, being able to put a color finish on the wood and still see the grain in it. I would read below more on how to finish wood carvings.

Question? What would you use for the preservation of green wood?
Open for answer:

Question? I just purchased a carving that is unpainted, what kind of paint do I use to finish it?

Milton: It is your carving, you can finish it the way you wish. I usually do as I stated below in the next question. The main thing is whatever you do if you use a sanding sealer first or an under coating make sure it is a water base or oil base to match your final finish what ever you decide to use there, oil or water base. I like to keep them the same. You can do any finish you would do on any other wood to please your eye. I would suggest also if going outdoors with your sculpture I would use an oil base finish.

Question? While carving a piece (a large piece can take me several days) I’ve read that a mixture of 1/2 linseed and 1/2 paint thinner should be applied intermittently while carving . Is this a good idea – even when the final finish is marine varnish?

Milton: Finishes can vary due to the type of wood being used, the moisture content, the environment it is to be displayed in, and if finishing the carving all at once or over a period of time. Myself I use just about all black cherry dead standing or out of my firewood pile. The one main thing that I learned the hard way is to never leave it bare when putting away for even a day. Soon as I see the smallest cracks with my glasses on…. I put the oil or sanding sealer on or It will develop small cracks that will turn big over night. The more heat the faster this is going to happen. I always coat mine with sanding sealer or 3 in 1 oil in-between work stages. I only use the oil if that’s what I’m going to use for a base preservative under my main sealer. I use the 3 in 1 oil when I want a deeper tone to my wood. It makes the black cherry a deep aged look. When I’m done with a carving I either give it all the oil it will take for about 3 days brushed on. If not using oil I use sanding sealer and give my carvings 1 coat a day for 2 or 3 days. I use an oil base spar/urethane in clear, satin, and gloss. It all depends on the carving and what the customer wants for a finish. Putting a finish on the bottom for me is like this: If you believe the moisture should seep in and out at will and stabilize or you think the carving should not have any moisture to enter or leave. I let my inside carvings not sealed on the bottom and my outside ones I seal. I carve mostly only dry dead standing or cut dried black cherry logs so most of my wood is a hardwood and already fairly well seasoned but will still crack real quick without a sanding sealer on it. I do not cut kerfs in dry cherry but do in green wood. I use all outdoor type spar/urethane because I never know if I am going to put some carvings outside and bring others inside. I like to rotate them different times of the year, also I imagine some customers might too. This is one method. You will find as many ways to finish as you can find carvers. This is just my way. I finish my mushrooms different. Listed below.

Question? I have a fresh cut tree stump, I am going to attempt to sculpt a Madonna from the seven foot stump. What should I coat the tree with as I carve?

Milton: I would use Sanding sealer or a thinned out varnish between carving time to keep it from cracking.

Question? Log oil and sanding oil seem to be used a lot on carvings, where do you purchase these?

Cheryl: Sanding sealer is common and found anywhere stains and paints are sold. I like BullsEye because it dries in 15 min or so. Minwax takes a little longer but they’re all pretty similar. As far as oils, I find Australian Timber oil (True Value Hardware, Menards, Home Depot) to be far too expensive, when you can get McKloskey transparent deck oil for $14/gal or so (Walmart). Realize that deck/wood oils are not big sellers in winter, so you may have some difficulty finding them until spring.

For great color, I’ve used Behr solid color outdoor wood preservative. The black looks fantastic on bears. Then I overspray the whole carving with transparent honey brown to give the wood a soft glow of gold. Soak that carving well.

So what you want are wood oils, whether designated as log oils for log homes or deck oils for decks, fences, or outdoor furniture. You want UV protection, mildew resistance, and resistance to weathering/water.

Milton: I also like to use Royal Wood Log Oil from Ace Hardware. Not bad priced and I get good results so far in two years of using this product for an oil finish. 3 in 1 oil makes a deep color on black cherry making it looked far more aged then it is.

Question? How do I finish a carving?

Milton: Finishes can vary due to the type of wood being used, the moisture content, the environment it is to be displayed in, and if finishing the carving all at once or over a period of time. Myself I use just about all black cherry dead standing or out of my firewood pile. The one main thing that I learned the hard way is to never leave it bare when putting away for even a day. Soon as I see the smallest cracks with my glasses on…. I put the oil or sanding sealer on or It will develop small cracks that will turn big over night. The more heat the faster this is going to happen. I always coat mine with sanding sealer or 3 in 1 oil in-between work stages. I only use the oil if that’s what I’m going to use for a base preservative under my main sealer. I use the 3 in 1 oil when I want a deeper tone to my wood. It makes the black cherry a deep aged look. When I’m done with a carving I either give it all the oil it will take for about 3 days brushed on. If not using oil I use sanding sealer and give my carvings 1 coat a day for 2 or 3 days. I use an oil base spar/urethane in clear, satin, and gloss. It all depends on the carving and what the customer wants for a finish. Putting a finish on the bottom for me is like this: If you believe the moisture should seep in and out at will and stabilize or you think the carving should not have any moisture to enter or leave. I let my inside carvings not sealed on the bottom and my outside ones I seal. I carve mostly only dry dead standing or cut dried black cherry logs so most of my wood is a hardwood and already fairly well seasoned but will still crack real quick without a sanding sealer on it. I do not cut kerfs in dry cherry but do in green wood. I use all outdoor type spar/urethane because I never know if I am going to put some carvings outside and bring others inside. I like to rotate them different times of the year, also I imagine some customers might too. This is one method. You will find as many ways to finish as you can find carvers. This is just my way. I finish my mushrooms different.

Question? How do you clean and store your paint brushes?

Milton: An old guy that hated to paint and hated to clean his brushes more showed me this one. He said just wrap them in a plastic bag or wrapper of some kind and put them in the freezer. I found this to work great. After a number of freezes and thaws I clean them and start the freezing again tell they are no good and toss them. One kind of spar/urethane made them gum up. Don’t remember the name of it. All other paints and spars it worked great on.
Another way that works good for us frequent users of paint brushes is to set them in a pail of water submerged. Just take them out and wipe them off and use them. Just make sure to keep them submerged and not let the water evaporate.

Question? I carved a bear out of a Pine log , this pine was killed by beetles and I cut it down this makes it about 1.5yrs dead 🙂 The wood is still solid I brushed it with cedar tone fence stain and cut a kerfs’ line….. I will put a coat of spar on it next……. Does this sound right….? should I let it dry a few more months?

Cheryl: I personally don’t think spar is necessary and it’s likely to flake off within 3 years. See what protection attributes your fence stain has (UV and/or moisture protection, etc.). It may be enough by itself. Once it’s warm outside again, spray one of the many wood deck protections that are available on your carving, soaking it well. Use a tinted spray to deepen your color or a transparent selection. The effect can be beautiful and longer lasting than spar.

Question: Torches? I have carved a bear and burned the fuzzes off with a small propane torch, but to char the bear to make it black I would think you need a larger torch such as a weed burner type that’s connected to a 5 gal propane tank, is this what’s commonly used?

Milton: Yes that is what most use to burn with on bigger carvings. A Weed burner torch. I use the small one as I do smaller carvings mostly, but I use nap gas instead of propane. It gives a much hotter flame.

Insurance

Question: What insurance do most carvers use when putting on shows?

Milton: This is the one I heard talked about being used the most, I don’t use it because I only carve at home.
Specialty Insurance Agency
http://www.specialtyinsuranceagency.com/insurance.html
Performers of the US & Vendors of the US
PO Box 24
New Richmond, WI 54017
Ph: 715.246.8908
Fax: 715-246-4257
steph@specialtyinsuranceagency.com

Power Tools

Question: What kind of power tools do chainsaw carvers use that don’t do 100% chainsaw carving?

Milton: I mostly all chainsaw carve but at times if a customer wants more detail then I can do with the chainsaw I use dremel tools and a Die grinder. I use the Saburr-Tooth bits almost exclusively. I have a couple of other bits that work ok for some things but I find the Saburr-Tooth bit overall the best for my dremel and die grinder. Occasionally I use a surface grinder and also use the tools on them. That’s why we sell them, I think they are great for sculpting. Some other carvers I am sure use everything but the kitchen sink.

Question: What kind of power tools do chainsaw carvers use that don’t do 100% chainsaw carving?

Cheryl: I recommend two important tools. An angle grinder with 80, 120 and 240 grit sanding discs. I would not suggest getting a Saburr wheel with this until you have experience handling the discs without injuring yourself. A die grinder that can accommodate both 1/4″ and 1/8″ bits. I would suggest Saburr flame and sphere bits (green or yellow) with 1/4″ shanks, and a dovetail Kutzall silver 1/8″ bit. There is a lot of versatility to be enjoyed with these few pieces.

Sculpting Methods

Question? What’s the best way to secure the base of a tall skinny log so that it does not move when carving?

Milton: I would lay it down blocked up or if small enough lift it on some lumber horses or a prop to a good carving height. Then I would wedge it and screw the wedges in with wood screws.

Question? I am a new carver.2 years running. My question is, have you ever used auto body filler in the small cracks. I saw a chainsaw carver in Jackson Hole WY use it. He said it works great, you can use oil, stain, paint right over the auto filler and its cheaper than wood filler.

Milton: I have used it in smaller size holes when in a hurry, it works great. I also use the clear Gorilla glue and saw dust from the same carving when possible or same type of wood to fill smaller cracks and holes. For real big ones I will carve a plug that size and use the clear Gorilla glue to hold it in and then shave it off or carve it again.

Question? What is used to texture a bears fur? Some of the bears I see its hard to believe its a chainsaw as the blade is so wide. I’ve used a die grinder with Ice but haven’t tried it with wood.

Cheryl: Unless the animal carving is smaller than a cat, I always use the saw to carve the fur. There are a lot of other tools available to you, but they take so long that I always go back to the saw. Keep in mind that you are not approaching the wood at a perpendicular angle and plunge cutting, but instead you are stroking the wood with your bar/chain just as you would use a pencil on paper.

I was taught to “draw” the hair on the bear as if you were drawing flames, or making multiple S curves without lifting the chain from the wood. A series of these overlapping marks looks just like fur, especially after flap sanding.

Milton: Some people use the side of the chain and make fur or other methods with the chainsaw. Others use the Kutzall dovetail bit, it is the most versatile bit from what I hear for either a Dremel or die grinder for this work. It’s used for eyes, claws, and fur. Use the chainsaw to make the grooves between toes and create the outside curve, then use the dovetail to take out the wood under the claws. The bit gives you just enough reach (you don’t have to cut under the whole claw or you will risk it breaking off).

Question? How do you know how far to cut into a carving with a plunge cut?

Milton: I use to take a black indelible ink pen I used in my greenhouse and marked my bar. After some cutting it would wear off. I now take and mark it with my dremel tool to mark the bar permanently. I also know from the tip of my bar on my saw to the back of it the measurement, plus to the back the saw from the tip of the bar, and any other easy spot to use is good to know and remember when cutting. I started doing this cutting firewood years ago and kept refining it.. Any method that is good for you will work.

Question? What do you use for eyes on your carvings:

Milton: I usually carve mine by hand. the better the carving the more detail. Try carving eyes inside out. I often hear new carvers say that they have the most trouble with faces and in particular, the eyes. When carving eyes, the common practice is to start at the outside and carve the eyelids and wrinkles first, then carve the eyeballs last. What often happens is that you run out of space for the eyeball. Try reversing the process. Carve the eyeball first, then the eyelid and wrinkles. Eyeballs tend to be a little on the large side at first, but you will have room for all the parts and its much easier. After you get the process down pat, proportion will fall into place.

Rick Woodward Eyes: After the paint is dry lay the carving down so the eyes are level. Its Devcon 5 minute epoxy. in the syringe. If your careful, use a toothpick pick up a small drop and you can put it right on the iris. If you wait a minute it will start to thicken, and not flow out so well. this will build a “cornea” or the lens bump. let it set up then pick up a bigger drop of fresh epoxy and let it flow over the whole eyeball. Don’t mess with it after it flows, you’ll leave a trail. I think The Indian i did is on Chainsawsculptors.com at Indian eyes site with a close up of the eye before epoxy and after in another picture. Arts & Craft Gallery.

Cheryl Campbell Eyes:

A few tips that might help you:
1) do one eye at a time. The epoxy will flow slowly and you’ll have enough to keep track of.
2) lay the carving down (talk soothingly so it doesn’t get nervous)
2) you don’t need a lot, so maybe squeeze out a nickel sized dollop on a disposable plastic lid, foil, cardboard, something you can throw away.
3) Terry McKinnon recommended using a screw head to stir it up and apply a drop. It’s like a mini-spoon and I still use that to apply a big drop to cover the whole eye.
4) I also try to get a slight cornea bulge, but it’s in the way I move the carving or use a toothpick for control. Rick’s way might be better. I put it in because it’s easy and picks up the light.
4) More is not better. It’s harder to control and leave a smooth surface. You want it to just coat the eyeball, not flow over the edge. Use a toothpick to gently scrape it back to the high point of the eye or remove it.
5) Learn to quit playing with it. At some point it won’t settle and you’ll leave a lumpy, uneven surface that will definitely show when the light hits it.
6)If you screw up, grind it off. Check out Cheryl’s fox eyes: Gallery
Once you put the epoxy on, DON’T coat over the eyes with the finish you’re using for the rest of the carving!! You’ll completely lose the effect and the point of putting it on in the first place.
Terry McKinnin passed this along to put a thin first coat of epoxy on, put a little dot of white for a highlight (try at 2:00 position), then put another coat of epoxy on. It will give it a real 3D effect.
More Sculpting Methods Continued

Wood

Question? Do you carve on any type of wood, for example would cotton wood trees be any good to carve?

I myself and most carvers have a favorite wood they love. Mine is black cherry because I own a lot of it growing on my land and I love the detail I get with hardwoods. It also is a pretty wood. I do carve about any type of wood I get a hold of. cotton wood I have never carved but I do carve aspen or poplar which I believe is close.
Question? I have a pine stump the top of the tree had no life but the stump is still wet I would like to make a high back chair out of it. Would it be best to let it dry (a little, a lot) or cut it wet? Do I need to treat the wood as I go or wait till I’m done with designs and all?

Open for answering.

Question? Fresh cut pine , after carving how do you handle as far as treating…….. Let it dry for months first ?

Barre: Wood is something like 85% moister when it is fresh cut. It is very important to allow water to evaporate from the surface of wood and replace that water initially with a permeable finish. There are some water based finishes I have tried but I don’t like them as much as oil based for this purpose. Spar, straight poly and other plastics are like putting that sponge in a plastics bag the wood cannot breath. What ever you choose to use give the wood time to develop small checks in the end grain that lets you know the wood is dry a bit and will take a finish. Penetrating oil finishes with a little poly in them, replace the water evaporating out of the wood with out making a plastic coating. In time if you like the poly coated look you can add straight poly.

Question? What do I need and where do I get wood thanks. I also need to know what kind of wood thanks for help. John

Jim: You can buy or get free wood sometimes from sawmills, tree services, landscapers, firewood sellers or even excavators who do lot clearing for builders. Generally softwoods are preferable with white pine being a favorite of many and cedar also. It depends on what area you live in as to what is available, affordable and easily carved. The logs can be green which makes them easier to carve as a rule

Question? What use are burls?

Milton: I have been taking some of these burls and cutting them in half and using them for lamp bases, the knobs on large logs can be cut off and if good can be peeled and used too.. I then use a 2 inch tree or desired piece of of wood and make the tower for the lamp. I use a tree a few inches in Diameter with some black cherry burls starting to grow out of it. It makes the lamp tower look more interesting. I otherwise carve something on the lamp pole and/or base. Some of the bigger burls I have cut into slabs with my Alaskan Sawmill and use them for end tables.

Question? What do you do for cracks in carvings?

Milton: Before you carve a piece of wood, cut an inch or two thick slice off it. Then lay that piece of wood in the shade. Let it dry tell you start to see enough cracks in it so you can read the wood as to where the cracks are going to happen. You can pick your piece up, then match it to the log you are carving and see the places the cracks will happen. This way you can locate your kerfs cut into the right location on the carving and put the back where it should belong for minimal damage to the carving from cracks. I’m sure that some variance in this rule will change with defects lower in the wood or grain changes and other character changes. I’m going to experiment with this in the summer and refine this more.

If you must repair cracks in carvings, form a small wedge. Use wood from the same piece of wood you are repairing if possible, if not try and use the same type and color of wedge as the wood being repaired. Make sure that this wedge is cut so the grain is the same direction as the grain in the crack you are going to repair. This is important for a blend in repair. If need be straighten the crack best you can to accept the wedge. After that tap the wedge into the crack and see where it is high. I usually do this and sand off the high spots with my dremel tool with a drum sander on it. I do this tell I feel I have a tight fit on my wedge. Apply the proper amount of glue and tap the wedge into the crack. I use a roofing knife and scour both sides the wedge and it will snap off easy. I then sand the wedge even with the carving. When finishing the piece natural I like to burn them with a torch. If I have wedges that show some, I take a black indelible marker and just hit them to blend them in and finish right over the top with my finishes that I am using.

Donations to ChainsawSculptors.com

0

Contact Information

Chainsawsculptors.com
243 North Hill Road
Iron River, Michigan 49935
sculptures@chainsawsculptors.com or sculptors@fast-air.net
Phone 906-265-9599

Donations can be made by mail or Paypal or 5 major credit cards just click the Donation Logo below. We Thank you for your Donations to pay for site expenses and maintanence

Country Outpost

0

Member Storefronts
“A Place for Members to sell new and used carving related tools”
Any Member Wishing a Free Storefront Please E-mail Me
Chainsaws/Carving Tools/Related Material

Artistry In Wood – Scoggins T-Shirts
Bear Necessities Sculpture LLC – Echo Carving Packages
Chainsaw Carving Books – Numerous chainsaw and hand carving books of many types
Doug Ricks – Third Hand Log Stand
Saburr-Tooth Tools – SABURR TOOTH™ power carving burrs have been long known for their cutting speed and quality
Save Edge – Files for Your Every Need
Superior Saw – Stihl & Husqvarna Dealership We Service all saws – Carving – Logging – Climbing Gear

Commission a Chainsaw Artist

0

Commission Job Listings

The main purpose here is to connect Chainsaw Sculptors and Customers together

Chainsaw Sculptors Wanted

PRIVATE PARTY OR COMMERCIAL WORK

Pamela
croskeyking@yahoo.com
724-816-8558
Gibsonia, PA 15044
Have a tree stump about 4 feet high. Hubby tried to carve a bear but didn’t turn out. Would like to get someone to finish the job and make it a gift for him for Father’s day. We are about 20 miles north of Pittsburgh, pa.

Hello talented artists. We are ‘the Tree Doctors’ located in Parkesburg, Chester County PA.
We’d like to offer our clients the ability to select carving rather than whole tree removal. Would anyone be interested in subcontracting for us?
Thank you all.
Mike M.
ISA Certified Arborist
homegardens@comcast.net

I work for a tree care company in Beaver Dam, WI. We occasionally get asked if we know of someone who performs this service. Sometimes the request is someone able to carve the trunk of a tree we have removed the rest of and left the stump and stub at a certain height. Is there anyone close to this area that does either type of carvings/sculptures?
Sincerely,
Renee Lassanske, Office Manager
K&B Tree and Lawn Care, LLC.
101 Beltline Drive
Beaver Dam, WI 53916
920-885-6982
Owner’s: Bob Biel and Dan Keel

I own a tree care company just west of Denver, Colorado. I am often asked if
I know someone who can carve art out of tree stumps we leave. Can you refer
me to someone in your organization who can be of service? Thank you.
Mike Goldblatt
Lam Tree Service
303-674-8733 – fax 303-674-1968